Mehul R Shah, M.D. - Orthopaedic Surgeon - New York Hospital for Joint Diseases - NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER
Mehul R Shah, M.D. - Orthopaedic Surgeon - New York, NY: 212-598-3897, 646-501-7417 - Lake Success, NY: 516-467-8600

News Updates

  • Wearable neuromuscular device may help reduce ACL injuries in female soccer players

    Using a wearable neuromuscular device can reduce the risk of ACL injury in female soccer athletes, according to new research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO.

    Read More

  • Knee Injections vs. Knee Replacement: What are My Options?

    According to the Arthritis Foundation, over 50 million Americans have arthritis. The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative joint disease. Though it can occur in younger people, it often affects people 50 years of age and older.

    Read More

  • Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men

    Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a University of Missouri researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

    Read More

  • Comparable results seen with high- vs low-intensity plyometric exercise after ACL reconstruction

    Results from this randomized controlled trial showed both low- and high-intensity plyometric exercise for rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction positively affected knee function, knee impairments and psychological status among patients after 8 weeks of intervention.

    Read More

  • Care of Shoulder Pain in the Overhead Athlete

    Shoulder complaints are common in the overhead athlete. Understanding the biomechanics of throwing and swimming requires understanding the importance of maintaining the glenohumeral relationship of the shoulder.

    Read More

  • Why is calcific tendinitis so painful?

    Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, typically characterized by calcium deposits on the rotator cuff, is an extremely painful condition that can severely impair movement and life quality. A new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, found a significant increase in blood vessel and pain receptor growth among patients with this condition.

    Read More

  • New work on knee cartilage structure to aid better replacements and injury treatments

    Fibrocartilage tissue in the knee is comprised of a more varied molecular structure than researchers previously appreciated, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware. Their work informs ways to better treat such injuries as knee meniscus tears - treatment of which are the most common orthopaedic surgery in the United States -- and age-related tissue degeneration, both of which can have significant socioeconomic and quality-of-life costs. The team published their work this week online ahead of print in Nature Materials.

    Read More

  • Recommendations for patient activity after knee replacement vary among surgeons

    During recovery after knee replacement surgery, exercise is critical. After initial recovery, patients will want to resume more strenuous activities. In addition to exercise prescribed by a physical therapist, several studies have shown patients who participated in athletic activities prior to surgery will want to continue this practice after surgery. However, how much activity and how strenuous this activity should be remains unclear.

    Read More

  • Cholesterol levels and tendon pain may be related

    (Reuters Health) – People with unhealthy blood cholesterol levels are more likely to have tendon pain or altered tendon structure, according to a new review.

    Read More

  • Activity could help keep knees lubricated

    Cartilage is filled with fluid -- about 80% of the volume of the cartilage tissue -- that plays the essential roles of supporting weight and lubricating joint surfaces. Loss of this fluid, called synovial fluid, results in a gradual decrease in cartilage thickness and increase in friction, which is related to the degradation and joint pain of osteoarthritis. Since cartilage is porous, fluid is readily squeezed out of the holes over time. Yet the symptoms associated with osteoarthritis usually take decades to develop. Researchers have now proposed a mechanism that explains how motion can cause cartilage to reabsorb liquid that leaks out.

    Read More

  • Bats and balls, not base runners, cause worst injuries to major league catchers

    Contrary to popular belief, the worst injuries baseball catchers face on the field come from errant bats and foul balls, not home-plate collisions with base runners, according to findings of a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Read More

  • Stiff shoulders less likely to re-tear after rotator cuff repair vs non-stiff shoulders

    Patients who had preoperative shoulder stiffness and those who developed stiffness at 6 weeks and 12 weeks postoperatively after rotator cuff repair were less likely to experience a re-tear compared with patients who had no stiffness, according to results presented here.

    Read More

  • Researchers call for consideration of pre-injury status in ACL reconstruction evaluations

    Investigators who studied outcomes following ACL reconstruction said they believe patients’ pre-injury status has been overlooked in determining postoperative results.

    Read More

  • Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men

    Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

    Read More

  • Factors affected variability in PF instability injuries among high school athletes

    Understanding that patterns of patellofemoral instability injuries among high school athletes may vary by sport, sex and type of exposure, which investigators in this study found, may help with the formulation of new injury prevention strategies and to decrease the risk of further patellofemoral instability injuries.

    Read More

FirstPrevious | Pages 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 11 of 11 | Next | Last
Sports Medicine - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Knee Arthroscopy - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
ACL Reconstruction - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Shoulder Arthroscopy - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Ankle Arthroscopy & Reconstruction - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Publications - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Patient Testimonials - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Multimedia Patient Education - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
After Visit Handouts - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Insurance - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
Map & Directions - Mehul R Shah, M.D.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
Mehul R Shah, M.D. on YouTube Mehul R Shah, M.D. on Twitter Mehul R Shah, M.D. on Facebook Mehul R Shah, M.D. on Linkedin
Bookmark and Share
 
 

© Mehul R Shah, M.D. Orthopaedic Surgeon Sports Medicine Arthroscopic New York NY

Your Practice Online